Former Mountie who tortured son should get 23 years in prison, Crown argues

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OTTAWA — Crown prosecutors want a former Mountie who tortured and starved his young son to spend 23 years behind bars.

Prosecutor Marie Dufort told a sentencing hearing today that the abuse the man inflicted on his son was horrific and of the worst magnitude.

She said such a sentence would be in step with what society demands, noting that Parliament has recently strengthened sentencing provisions for child abuse, particularly when it involves sexual offences.

The former counter-terrorism officer, who cannot be identified under a court order protecting his son’s identity, was found guilty in November of aggravated assault, sexual assault causing bodily harm, forcible confinement and failing to provide the necessaries of life.

He was charged shortly after his emaciated and injured 11-year-old was found wandering his west Ottawa neighbourhood in February 2013 in search of water after escaping his home.

The man’s wife, the boy’s adoptive mother, was found guilty of assault with a weapon and failing to provide the necessaries of life and was given a three-year sentence.

Defence lawyer Robert Carew argued the man should receive a sentence of between five and seven years.

Court heard Wednesday from two psychiatrists who testified that the man was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and chronic depression.

The boy’s maternal aunt also read a victim impact statement, calling the prosecution of her nephew’s parents a gut-wrenching, achingly long journey.


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Former Mountie who tortured son should get 23 years in prison, Crown argues

0

OTTAWA — Crown prosecutors want a former Mountie who tortured and starved his young son to spend 23 years behind bars.

Prosecutor Marie Dufort told a sentencing hearing today that the abuse the man inflicted on his son was horrific and of the worst magnitude.

She said such a sentence would be in step with what society demands, noting that Parliament has recently strengthened sentencing provisions for child abuse, particularly when it involves sexual offences.

The former counter-terrorism officer, who cannot be identified under a court order protecting his son”s identity, was found guilty in November of aggravated assault, sexual assault causing bodily harm, forcible confinement and failing to provide the necessaries of life.

He was charged shortly after his emaciated and injured 11-year-old was found wandering his west Ottawa neighbourhood in February 2013 in search of water after escaping his home.

The man”s wife, the boy”s adoptive mother, was found guilty of assault with a weapon and failing to provide the necessaries of life and was given a three-year sentence.

Defence lawyer Robert Carew argued the man should receive a sentence of between five and seven years.

Court heard Wednesday from two psychiatrists who testified that the man was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and chronic depression.

The boy”s maternal aunt also read a victim impact statement, calling the prosecution of her nephew”s parents a gut-wrenching, achingly long journey.

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